Korean East Coast Bicycle Route icon.

North Gyeongsang Province Coast

The North Gyeongsang Province Coast's history and geography. ​

The East Coast Gyeongbuk Bike Path traverses the coast of North Gyeongsang Province on the East Sea. Let’s explore the province, then learn about the smaller county’s on the coast.

A picture of Osan Port (오산항) in Uljin County, South Korea.
The East Sea (Donghae; 동해), also known as the Sea of Japan, forms the eastern boundary of both North Gyeongsang Province and the Korean Peninsula.

North Gyeongsang Province

Explore the history and geography of North Gyeongsang Province.

North Gyeongsang Province (경상북도; map; Gyeongsangbuk-do) sits in the country’s southeast. It shares the southeast corner of the peninsula with South Gyeongsang Province. From 1314 to 1896 CE, Koreans referred to them as Gyeongsang Province (경상도).

The Stats
  • Population: 2,594,399
  • Size: 19,030 km²
  • Density: 136 people per km²
  • Capital: Andong City (안동시; map)
A picture of the Samsu Pavilion (삼수정) on the Nakdonggang Bike Path (낙동강자전거길) along the Nakdong River in South Korea.
Samsu Pavilion (삼수정) offers a sweeping view of the Nakdong River from a hilltop.

Though the country split Gyeongsang in half, North Gyeongsang Province is the second largest province, accounting for 18.95% of South Korea. But, when Daegu attained self-governing metropolitan city status in 1981, North Gyeongsang became the nation’s second least populated.

The Province holds 10 cities and 13 counties. Andong City is its capital. Pohang City on the east coast is the province’s most populous district.

Geography

Mountains and the sea encompass North Gyeongsang Province.

  • To the North: Gangwon Province and the Sobaek Mountain Range
  • To the south: South Gyeongsang Province
  • To the east: East Sea and the Taebaek Mountain Range
  • To the west: North Chungcheong Province and the Nakdong River

Mountains

Two of Korea’s most prominent mountain ranges dominate North Gyeongsang’s landscape.

A lush green field with low hills foregrounds the majestic Ulsan Rock and other rocky peaks of the Taebaek Mountain Range under low hanging clouds.
A lush green field with low hills foregrounds the majestic Ulsan Rock and other rocky peaks of the Taebaek Mountain Range under low hanging clouds.

Taebaek Mountain Range

The Taebaek Mountain Range is Korea’s backbone. It marches south from North Korea and blankets Gangwon Province with snow-capped peaks.

The Taebaek Mountain Range softens as it enters North Gyeongsang Province. Near Pohang’s Hyeongsan River (형산강; map), it devolves into patches of hills and short peaks.

Sobaek Mountain Range

The Sobaek Mountain Range branches off from Taebaek mountains on North Gyeongsang Province’s northern border. It then cuts west, then south to the Korea Strait.

The Sobaek Mountains are Korea’s tallest. Composed of rock pressurized in the earth’s crust, their rugged peaks are resistant to erosion, giving them a bare, rock-faced appearance.

Before modern transportation, both the Taebaek and Sobaek ranges separated North Gyeongsang Province from the other parts of the peninsula and even itself.

  • The Taebaek Mountain Range isolated the province’s east coast settlements from the inland regions.
  • The Sobaek Mountain Range separated the province from the Seoul and Gyeonggi Province area, which held Korea’s capital from the Joseon Dynasty (1392 ~ 1897) until today.
The Sobaek Mountains are Korea’s tallest. Composed of rock pressurized in the earth’s crust, their rugged peaks are resistant to erosion, giving them a bare, rock-faced appearance.
The Sobaek Mountains are Korea’s tallest. Composed of rock pressurized in the earth’s crust, their rugged peaks are resistant to erosion, giving them a bare, rock-faced appearance.

Water

A river and sea help to define the province’s geography.

Nakdong River

The Nakdong River (낙동강; map) is South Korea’s longest. Its 510-kilometer run (317 mi) begins in the Taebaek Mountain Range in the northern Gangwon Province. The river then flows like an accented “Ć” through the North and South Gyeongsang Provinces before spilling into the Korea Strait in Busan City.

Almost every river and stream in North and South Gyeongsang Provinces flow into the Nakdong River. Before roads and rail, the Nakdong provided a vital transportation network for the region. It continues to support North Gyeongsang by providing irrigation and fresh fish.

A picture of the Nakdong River (낙동강) from Gayajinsa Temple (가야진사) on the Nakdonggang Bike Path (낙동강자전거길) in Yangsan City, South Korea.
View the Nakdong River and its triangle topped mountain companions from Gayajinsa Temple in Yangsan City.

East Sea

The East Sea (Donghae; 동해; map), also known as the Sea of Japan, forms the eastern boundary of both North Gyeongsang Province and the Korean Peninsula.

The East Sea has a handful of unique characteristics:

  • It’s the deepest of the three bodies of water that surround the peninsula.
  • Narrow straits effectively separate it from other bodies of water, including the Pacific.
  • A relatively higher oxygen level produces abundant marine life.

The residents of North Gyeongsang Province’s coast depend on the East Sea’s bountiful fish and crustaceans for food and commerce.

Climate

North Gyeongsang Province’s enormous area creates two distinct climate zones.

  • North Gyeongsang’s inland regions don’t lie near major bodies of water. It receives some of the hottest temps in the nation. Daegu, once a part of the province, sits in a still-air basin. Averages reach 31°C (88°F) in the summer.
  • East of the Taebaek Mountains, the East Sea moderates temperatures on the coast. Summer’s reach 29°C (84°F).

Like the rest of Korea, rain falls most in the summer months. Uljin and Yeongdeok Counties receive much more snow than other parts of the province.

History

North Gyeongsang Province’s history stretches back thousands of years. It was once the epicenter of culture and power in Korea. Let’s briefly peruse its archives.

Donggung Palace (안압지; 674 CE) holds a few remaining buildings built by the Kingdom of Silla in Gyeongju City.
Donggung Palace (안압지; 674 CE) holds a few remaining buildings built by the Kingdom of Silla in Gyeongju City.

Gyeongsang Province

Throughout the Goryeo Dynasty (918 ~ 1392 CE) and Joseon Dynasty (1392 ~ 1897 CE), North Gyeongsang Province and South Gyeongsang Gyeongsang were one.

Government officials created the name “Gyeongsang” (경상) by combining the first names of the province’s major cities: Gyeongju (주) and Sangju (주).

Yeongnam Region

Historically, the province is a part of the Yeongnam Region. “Yeongnam,” coined during the Goryeo Dynasty, means “the region south of the Joryeong Mountain (조령산; map).”

Before cars, trains, and airplanes, the Sobaek Mountain Range geographically cut off the Yeongnam region from the rest of Korea. The only way south was through a few cobbled together roads and hiking trails.

The Great Yeongam Road held the most fame. It crossed the mighty Sobaek Mountains at the Mungyeong Saejae Pass below Joryeong Mountain.

Bulguksa Temple (불국사; 751 CE) in Gyeongju City is headquarters of the Korean Buddhist Jogye Order. It holds six national treasures.
Bulguksa Temple (불국사; 751 CE) in Gyeongju City is headquarters of the Korean Buddhist Jogye Order. It holds six national treasures.

Kingdom of Silla

During the Three Kingdoms Period (57 BCE ~ 668 CE), Gyeongsang Region birthed the Kingdom of Silla (신라; 57 BCE ~ 935 CE), one of three powers on the Korean peninsula.

  1. Kingdom of Goguryeo (고구려; 37 BCE ~ 668 CE) ruled the north with a mighty army.
  2. Kingdom of Baekje (백제; 18 BCE ~ 660 CE) controlled the southwest with a capable navy.
  3. Kingdom of Silla (신라; 57 BCE ~ 935 CE) took Korea’s southeast.

Silla was the weakest kingdom. However, they were skilled diplomats and made a handful of strategic moves to gain power. 

  • Goguryeo invaded Baekje in the 5th century. So Silla allied with Baekje and helped them beat back Goguryeo.
  • A few years later, Silla allied with China’s Tang Dynasty and conquered the weakened Baekje and Goguryeo.

Silla was the first kingdom to unite the Korean peninsula. Their ancient capital was North Gyeongsang Province’s Gyeongju City (경주시; map). This shifted Korea’s center of power to North Gyeongsang Province for over four hundred years.

Goryeo and Joseon Kingdoms

The succeeding kingdoms — Goryeo (918 ~ 1392 CE) and Joseon (1392 ~ 1897 CE) — moved Korea’s capital back north. However, the Gyeongsang region kept its influence.

During their reign, Silla built the leading Confucian academies and Buddhist temples in Andong and Gyeongju. During the Joseon Dynasty, these institutions trained Korea’s most important ancient scholars: Yi Hwang (이황; ₩1,000 bill) and Yi I (이이; ₩5,000 bill).

North Gyeongsang Province also had some of the most productive farms on the peninsula, making it the most populous province in Korea by the end of the 19th century.

Korean War

Korea was split in half after WWII and the Japanese Occupation (1910~1945). Communists took the north half of the peninsula. Capitalists claimed the lower half.

June 1950, North Korea invaded South Korea, sparking the Korean War (1950~1953). North Korea’s larger and better equipped army (KPA) swept south into Seoul in less than three days. They forced the South Korean Army (ROK) and UN Forces (USA) to retreat south.

South Korea moved their capital to Daegu in the Gyeongsang Region. However, the KPA quickly surrounded the city and forced the ROK to move their capital again to Busan.

A picture of the Bridge of Patriotism (호국의다리) along the Nakdonggang Bike Path in Chilgok Country, South Korea.
During the Korean War, retreating ROK troops exploded the Bridge of Patriotism in North Gyeongsang Province and established the Pusan Perimeter.

August 5th, 1950, the Battle of Taegu (Daegu) began. The fifteen day skirmish halted the KPA’s unchecked advance and establishment the Pusan (Busan) Perimeter (부산 교두보 전투).

The Pusan Perimeter redrew South Korea’s shrunken borders around the Gyeongsang Province region, between the Nakdong River and East Sea on the southeast tip of the peninsula.

September 1950, UN and ROK forces swung around the peninsula and retook Seoul via Incheon (인천시; map). This led to a “pinball phase” of the Korean War.

  • October 1950, the UN and ROK beat back North Korea’s forces to China’s border.
  • November 1950, China joined the war and drove the UN and ROK back to Seoul.
  • January 1951, China and North Korea recaptured Seoul.
  • March 1951, the UN and ROK recaptured Seoul.

The war stagnated for two more years around today’s DMZ. China, the US, and North Korea signed the Korean Armistice in 1953.

The Pusan Perimeter in North and South Gyeongsang Province marked the ROK and UN’s furthest retreat. It was the only territory not seized by the North Korean Army.

Statues of Korean War soldiers at the War Memorial of Korea.
The War Memorial of Korea commemorates the soldiers who fought during the Korean War.

Miracle Years

After the Korean War, South Korea was in tatters. The conflict consumed the whole peninsula and leveled most cities.

After a series of false starts and reforms, General Park Chung-hee (박정희) overthrew the military dictatorship led by Chang Myon (장면) in 1962.

Through heavy-handed and often authoritarian means, Park enacted a series of Five-Year Plans that constructed basic infrastructure, improved agriculture, and built increasingly complex industrial sectors.

Born in North Gyeongsang Province’s Gumi City (구미시; map), Park Chung-hee directed a large portion of domestic and international stimulus to the Gyeongsang Region.

  • The South Korean government built the Gyeongbu Expressway and upgraded the Gyeongbu Railroad during Park’s reign. These transportation networks connected Seoul with Busan and supercharged the Gyeongsang Region’s economic development.
  • Park selected his hometown, Gumi City, for special industrial development. Today the city is one of the most economically powerful in North Gyeongsang Province, holding many high-tech manufacturing and research facilities.
  • To boost the domestic steel industry, Park’s government directed money towards the Pohang Iron & Steel Company (POSCO). Now the world’s sixth largest steel producer, POSCO transformed Pohang City into North Gyeongsang Province’s largest city.
North Gyeongsang Province’s largest city, Pohang, is home to the Pohang Iron & Steel Company (POSCO). It is the world’s sixth largest steel producer.
North Gyeongsang Province’s largest city, Pohang, is home to the Pohang Iron & Steel Company (POSCO). It is the world’s sixth largest steel producer.

Park Chung-hee was assassinated in 1979. But succeeding presidents from the Gyeongsang Region kept the investment flowing. Today, it holds some of the nation’s largest cities.

  • Busan, a part of South Gyeongsang Province until 1963, is the second biggest city in Korea. It holds Korea’s second largest port.
  • Daegu, a part of North Gyeongsang Province until 1981, is the fourth biggest city in the nation. It once was a textile powerhouse. Now it’s one of Korea’s tech leaders. 
  • Ulsan, a part of South Gyeongsang Province until 1997, is the country’s seventh biggest city. It holds one of the world’s largest car manufacturing plants and shipbuilding yards.
  • Changwon in South Gyeongsang, is the ninth largest city. It holds the Changwon Industrial Complex, an economic free zone filled with advanced manufacturing and research.

Southwest vs. Southeast

America has red states and blue states. What about Korea?

Korea has the southeast Gyeongsang (Yeongnam) region and the southwest Jeolla (Honam) region. They share counter political ideologies and economic destinies.

Culture

Cheomseongdae (첨성대; 600s CE; map) is the oldest surviving astronomical observatory in Asia.
Cheomseongdae (첨성대; 600s CE; map) is the oldest surviving astronomical observatory in Asia.

North Gyeongsang Province’s cultural heritage started during the Three Kingdoms Period. The Kingdom of Silla (57 BCE ~ 935 CE), which united the peninsula, located its capital in Gyeongju City and sprinkled cultural landmarks throughout the province.

The Kingdom of Silla built many Seowons (서원; Confucian academies) in North Gyeongsang Province, especially in Andong City. They birthed the birthed the Hwarang (화랑), a group of elite warriors.

Later, the Joseon Dynasty used these Seowons and provincial schools (향교; Hyanggyos) to train famous thinkers (Yi Hwang & Yi I).

Food

Historically separated by the Taebaek Mountain Range, the cuisines of North Gyeongsang Province’s inland and coastal regions differ.

The coastal district’s foods feature salty and bitter tastes. While inland districts employ more savory flavors.

A picture of “Snow Crab Street” (영덕대게로) in Ganggu Port, Yeongdeok County, South Korea.
Popularly known as “Snow Crab Street,” snow crab restaurants line the main road through town.

Coastal Districts

North Gyeongsang Province’s coastal districts, such as Pohang, Gyeongju, Uljin, and Yeongdeok, are famous for seafood, often dried and salted.

Uljin and Yeongdeok Counties attract tourists with their prized snow crabs. Both counties hold competing annual festivals.

A picture of Jjimdak, or glass noodles with chicken, and salted mackerel, an Andong City specialty.
Jjimdak, or glass noodles with chicken, and salted mackerel have been an Andong City specialty for hundreds of years.

Inland Districts

North Gyeongsang Province’s inner districts offer a different menu. While they serve some seafood, districts like Andong, Mungyeong, and Sangju use more beans, grains, and wild vegetables.

  • Andong Jjimdak (찜닭) — steamed chicken marinated in soy sauce.
  • Salted mackerel (간 고등어) — During the Joseon Dynasty, Andong City was the furthest up the Nakdong River where sea-caught mackerel could travel. So foodies from Seoul flocked to Andong to taste this delicacy. 
  • Heotjesabap (헛제삿밥) — mixed vegetables and rice. It’s like bibimbap (비빔밥), but uses soy sauce instead of red pepper paste.
  • Cabbage jeon (배추전) — savory Korean pancake.

Coastal Districts

Let’s look closer at Uljin County and Yeongdeok County, the two coastal North Gyeongsang Province districts on the East Coast Gyeongbuk Bike Path.

Both counties share similar locations, industries, and sights. But they include a few key differences.

Uljin County

Explore Uljin County, a coastal district filled with ports and highlights.​

Uljin County (울진군; map) is the northernmost North Gyeongsang District on the East Sea. It sits midway up South Korea’s eastern coastline.

The viewing deck at Mangyang Service Area on the East Sea in Uljin County.
The observatory at Mangyang Service Area on the East Sea in Uljin County.
The Stats
  • Population: 46,849
  • Size: 990 km²
  • Density: 47 people per km²
  • Main Population Center: Uljin Town (울진읍; map)

Uljin was once a part of the northern Gangwon Province. However, the county switched to North Gyeongsang Province in 1962 to get closer to the province’s booming economies in Pohang and Andong Cities.

Historically, the Taebaek Mountain Range and East Sea isolated the county from the rest of the nation. But its seclusion also allowed it to preserve its forests, mountains, and coast.

Coastal Uljin

Uljin sits on the East Sea. While mountains and forests cover the county’s western regions, all of its major towns live on the coast. Let’s explore them.

A picture of a fishing boat at Hupo Port (후포항) in Uljin County, South Korea.
Hupo Port (후포항) is Uljin County’s largest port. It accommodates both cargo ships and fishing boats.

Ports

Fishing boats and bustling markets fill Uljin’s two busiest ports. Here’s a brief glance at the country’s two most prominent:

  • Hupo Port (후포항; map) is the largest port in Uljin County. It accommodates both cargo ships and fishing boats. Each morning, over 170 fishing vessels depart Hupo in search of snow crab, octopus and cod. Deunggi Mountain sits on the port’s north edge. It holds a picturesque park, lighthouse, and see-through skywalk that extends over the East Sea.

Jukbyeon Port (죽변항; map) is Uljin’s most tourist-friendly port. It features a handful of highlights including a coastal monorail, lighthouse, and nearby maritime museum. Each day, its busy fish market auctions off fresh-caught squid, pollack, and snow crabs.

Other Highlights

Let’s check out Uljin’s seaside landmarks:

  • Mangyang Pavilion (Mangyangjeong; 망양정; map) is one of eight scenic spots along Korea’s east coast. This 700-year-old pavilion sits on top of a coastal hill with a panoramic view of the East Sea.
  • Wolsong Pavilion (Wolsongjeong; 월송정; map) is another one of eight scenic spots along the Korean coast. Perched next to the East Sea, a forest of pine trees surrounds the pavilion.
  • Sweetfish Bridge (은어다리; map) is a 243-meter-long pedestrian bridge that crosses Namdae Stream as it flows into the East Sea. The walking and cycling path passes through the mouths of two giant, shiny metallic fish.
A picture of Wolsong Pavilion (월송정) along the Gyeongbuk (East Coast) Bicycle Path (동해안자전거길 (경북)) in Uljin County (울진군), South Korea.
The Wolsong Certification Center sits near the entrance gate to Wolsong Pavilion on the Gyeongbuk Bike Path.

The Snow Crabs of Uljin

What’s Uljin County’s biggest attraction? Snow crabs. 

Every year in late February, Uljin’s Hupo Port holds the Uljin Snow Crab Festival (울진대게와 붉은대게축제). This three-day event includes an opening ceremony, singing contest, bare-handed fish catching, and a special cruise to Ulleung Island (Ulleungdo; 울릉도; map), which sits 120 kilometers (75 mi) off the peninsula in the East Sea.

What’s the traditional way to eat snow crabs? Steamed. Pick one out from the display tank in front of the restaurant. They drop it in a steamer for 15 minutes. Voila! Ready for chow.

But there’s more than one way to cook a snow crab. New iterations include:

  • Butter-roasted snow crab
  • Snow crab bibimbap (mixed rice, vegies, and meat)
  • Snow crab mulhoe (raw seafood soup)
  • Snow crab mandu (dumplings)
  • Snow crab bread
Sweetfish Bridge (은어다리) in Uljin County is a 243-meter-long pedestrian bridge that crosses Namdae Stream as it flows into the East Sea.
Sweetfish Bridge in Uljin County is a 243-meter pedestrian bridge over Namdae Stream near the East Sea.

Inland Uljin

While the coast dominates Uljin’s east, mountains and forests cover the county’s less populated western regions. Here are some of the county’s terrestrial highlights.

  • Deokgu Hot Springs (덕구온천; map) is a naturally occurring hot spring in a remote canyon. Nearby resorts pump its waters 4 kilometers to their compounds. The hot spring’s 43°C (109°F) sodium bicarbonate waters are said to help relieve everything from skin diseases to muscle fatigue.
  • Buryeongsa Valley (불영사계곡; map) is a winding valley. The sightseeing road that runs through it is famous among car cruisers and cyclists, especially in autumn. (Intercity buses that travel it provide vomit bags.) The valley’s name comes from the local Buryeongsa Temple (불영사; map).
  • Seongnyu Cave (Seongnyugul; 성류굴; map) is an 870-meter-long limestone cave. Designated a natural monument, it was the first cave in Korea opened to tourists.
  • Baekam Hot Springs (백암온천; map) is a famous mild alkalinity, harmlessly radioactive hot spring that reaches 53°C (127°F). It was first found over a thousand years ago, but developed during the Japanese occupation (1910 ~ 1945) and modernized in the 1970s. 
  • Uljin Geumgang Pine Forest Road (울진금강송숲길; map) is a hiking trail that winds through Uljin’s western mountains. The trails feature Geumgangsong or red pine trees. The county often restricts hiking on the forest road to prevent fires.
  • Gusugok Natural Recreation Forest (구수곡자연휴양림; map) sits in a valley below Eungbong Mountain (응봉산; map). It features red pine trees, mountain goats, and waterfalls. The name derives from the place where waters from nine valleys converge.

Inland Delicacies

Like its coast, Uljin’s forests bring a culinary bounty. The county’s specialties include Matsutake mushrooms, blueberries, and Chwinamul (취나물; bitter, wild leafy greens).

The Snow Crabs of Yeongdeok & Uljin

Since the Kingdom of Goryeo (918 ~ 1392 CE), both Yeongdeok and Uljin Counties earn their reputation for being the only districts in Korea to catch snow crabs.

Snow crabs range from 13 to 15 centimeters long (5 ~ 6 inches). They have wide, bumpy foreheads and triangular bodies. Their long legs, which are stuffed with succulent meat, resemble bamboo shoots.

A picture of “Snow Crab Street” (영덕대게로) in Ganggu Port, Yeongdeok County, South Korea.
Snow crabs are the most famous delicacy of both Yeongdeok and Uljin Counties.

These critters live between 30 to 1,800 meters deep on muddy sea floors and rocky outcrops. They’re mostly found off the coast of Alaska, Greenland, and the East Sea

Wangdolcho (왕돌초) is an reef that sits 23 kilometers off the coast of Uljin in the East Sea. Rising from 60 to 3 meters below the sea surface, this underwater mountain hosts over 120 marine species and an abundance of meat-bloated snow crabs.

Snow crab season runs from November to May, with crabs reaching peak weight in late-February. During this time, fishing boats from Yeongdeok and Uljin journey to Wangdolcho, fill their hulls with snow crabs, then sail back to their respective ports.

So the neighboring Uljin and Yeongdeok Counties live in harmony, each taking their own share of snow crabs and spreading the wealth? Right.

Not exactly.

In the 20th century, both Yeongdeok and Uljin were remote counties, cut off from the rest of Korea by the Taebaek Mountains. However, Yeongdeok had a better infrastructure. So Uljin fishers often sent their catch to Yeongdeok’s larger Ganggu Port to sell to wider markets.

Yeongdeok often rebranded Uljin-caught snow crabs as Yeongdeok snow crabs. This grew Yeongdeok’s reputation as the snow crab capital of Korea, leaving some Uljin fishers obscured and perturbed.

Over the years, Uljin has waged a PR campaign to enhance their brand as snow crab producers. They built monuments such as Golden Crab Park and hold the Uljin Snow Crab Festival every February to compete with Yeongdeok’s own seasonal event.

Yeongdeok County

Explore Yeongdeok County, a green country on the East Sea.

Yeongdeok County (영덕군; map) sits near the top of North Gyeongsang Province on the East Sea.

A moon hangs in a tree on Baekseok Beach (백석해변) in Yeongdeok County.
A moon hangs in a tree on Baekseok Beach in Yeongdeok County.
The Stats
  • Population: 34,560
  • Size: 741 km²
  • Density: 47 people per km²
  • Population Center: Yeongdeok Town (영덕읍; map)

Yeongdeok and Uljin are remote restrictions. Penned in by mountains and the East Sea, no expressways travel their lands. And proper rail service didn’t come to Yeongdeok until the Donghae Line completed construction in 2018.

However, compared to Uljin, Yeongdeok is more accessible.

The Taebaek Mountains enter Gangwon Province from North Korea as mighty peaks. They shrink as they enter Yeongdeok, creating a terrain that allows more roadway connections to economic engines like Pohang, the province’s largest city, and Andong, the province’s capital.

Coastal Yeongdeok

Like Uljin, most of Yeongdeok’s major settlements rest along the East Sea. Find a parade of ports and landmarks along the coast.

A picture of Ganggu Port (강구항) in Yeongdeok County, South Korea.
Ganggu Port in Yeongdeok County is one of the largest fishing ports on Korea’s east coast. It's specialty is snow crabs.

Ports

Yeongdeok’s ports feature more than just fishing boats and seafood markets. Let’s explore the top seaside settlements in Yeongdeok.  

  • Ganggu Port (강구항; map; aerial view) is one of the largest fishing ports on Korea’s east coast. Over 100 restaurants serving snow crabs, the delicacy Yeongdeok and Uljin are known for, line the streets of Ganggu. During peak crab season, when winter turns to spring, Ganggu Port’s roads clog with foodies in SUVs; motels, pensions, and hotels sell out; and Yeongdeok’s annual snow crab festival comes to town.
  • Chuksan Port (축산항; map; aerial view), or “Livestock Port,” didn’t get its name because its citizens raise pigs and cows. An early founder climbed Jokdo Mountain overlooking the port and gazed down. He thought the port’s shape resembled a cow laying down. Chuksan is Yeongdeok’s second largest port. Its fishers catch snow crabs, squid, octopus, and sandfish.
  • Daejin Port (대진항; map) is Yeongdeok County’s third largest. It’s famous amongst amateur fishers. They climb the port’s breakwater, cast their lines into the water, and hope to snag a black sea bream, yellowtail, and conger eel. The port’s other bounties include abalone and seaweed.

Though Koreans know Yeongdeok for its snow crabs, the country’s other famous marine products include: gwamegi (half-dried herring), dombai (aged shark meat), squid, flounder, octopus, and mackerel.

About 12% of Yeongdeok’s residents make a living from fishing. But since the 1970s, fish populations have plummeted. This forced fishers to supplement their incomes by opening factories, raising mushrooms, or taking on side jobs.

A picture of Changpomal Lighthouse (창포말등대) at Yeongdeok Sunrise Park (해맞이공원) in Yeongdeok County, South Korea.
Sunrise Park was devastated by a forest fire in 1997. Yeongdeok covered the coastal area with thousands of plants to help the region recover.

Other Highlights

Yeongdeok’s coast features several other noteworthy landmarks on its coast.

  • Goraebul Beach (고래불해수욕장; map) or “Whale Fire Beach” is 8 kilometers long. One of the most famous beaches on the East Sea, its soft sands and shallow waters cross six coastal villages. Beside the beach find campgrounds, restaurants, and coffee shops overlooking a giant whale sculpture.
  • Yeongdeok Sunrise Park (영덕해맞이공원; map) was devastated by an enormous forest fire in 1997. Since then, Yeongdeok covered the coastal area with thousands of plants, including daffodils, marigolds, camellias, and mulberry trees. Then the country weaved 2.1 kilometers of trails and stairs leading down the colorful hillside to viewing decks on the East Sea. Other park features include a crab-themed lighthouse, fish sculptures, and a 24-turbine wind farm in the hills above.
  • Samsa Marine Park (삼사해상공원; map) is a seaside park south of Ganggu Port. It sits atop a hill, offering spectacular views of the sun rising over the East Sea. It includes a 29-ton sunrise bell, fishing museum, and restaurants. The Samsa Marine Trail (map), a 233-meter-long walkway, extends over the East Sea a 1.5 kilometers south of the park.

Inland Yeongdeok

While the East Sea dominates the coast, forests and mountains cover over 80% of Yeongdeok County’s area. This swath of green provides many natural sights. Let’s explore the top highlights.

  • Okgye Valley (옥계계곡; map) is a hidden valley with murmuring mountain streams dotted with boulders and waterfalls. It’s popular among families for camping and swimming.
  • Naeyeon Mountain (Naeyeonsan; 내연산; map) is a picturesque mountain that spans Yeongdeok and Pohang City. It holds famous hiking trails and Bogyeongsa Temple (보경사; map).
  • Palgaksan Mountain (팔각산; map), or “Eight Peak Mountain,” is famous for its eight spires and their unusual, exposed rock formations.
A picture of whale sculpture Goraebul Beach (고래불해수욕장) in Yeongdeok County, South Korea.
Goraebul Beach or “Whale Fire Beach” in Yeongdeok County is one of the most famous beaches on the East Sea.

Inland Delicacies

Only 10% of Yeongdeok County’s hilly landscape is farmable. However, the county produces a few famous local products, including peaches, Matsutake mushrooms, and mineral water.