Cross-Country Routes icon.

Nakdonggang
Bicycle Path

Follow a mighty, meandering river to the bottom of the peninsula.

Korea’s longest waterway equals its longest bike path.

The fourth and final leg of the Cross-Country Route, the Nakdonggang Bicycle Path (낙동강자전거길) follows the Nakdong River (낙동강; Nakdonggang).

Unlike the Ara, Hangang, and Saejae, the Nakdong path doesn’t begin where the others left off. It starts in Andong (안동시) and flows 70 kilometers west to Sangju, the Saejae Bike Path’s end. Then it slides south through Daegu (대구시) and into Busan (부산시) on the southwest coast.

The Stats
Start
Andong City
(안동시)
← 389 km →
20 hours
End
Busan City
(부산시)
Checkpoints Logo
Checkpoints (11)
Bus Icon
Bus Terminals
Link button to Kakao Maps directions.
Directions
Link button to Kakao Maps Highlights.
Highlights

City-to-City Path Breakdown

Pass history and a hanok village, then meet the Cross-Country Route.

Discover a bike museum, an island park, and waving, riverside grass.

A short ride past wondrous weirs to Korea’s fourth largest city.

Climb steep hills with views of an ancient temple and Confucian academy.

A long stroll through riverside parks to the Cross-Country finish line.

Bike Path Overview

The Nakdong River Bike Path is the longest of all paths. Over some sharp hillsides, down meandering riverbanks, this path displays the Korean countryside’s beauty all the way.

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Bike Path Overview

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The Course

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Municipalities

Here is a complete list of the provinces and municipalities along the Saejae Bicycle Path.

Elevation

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Bike Path Types

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Certification

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Certification Centers

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A picture of the Haengchon Crossroads Certification Center on the Ocheon Bicycle Path in Yeonpung Town, South Korea.
Lying on the Saejae Bike Path, the Haengchon Crossroads Certification Center marks the start of the Ocheon Bicycle Path in Yeonpung Town.

The Nakdong Han River

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The eastern view from Ihwa Pass in Mungyeong City, South Korea.
Locals refer to the Ihwa Pass as Mungyeong Saejae because it's proximity to the historic mountain pass.

Highlights

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Chungju Light World (충주라이트월드) glows nightly near Tangeumdae Park (탄금대) in Chungju.
Chungju Light World (충주라이트월드) glows nightly near Tangeumdae Park (탄금대) in Chungju.

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How To Get There

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Intercity Bus

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A picture of an intercity bus with the luggage compartment open.
Pop your bike in the luggage compartment and hop on board the intercity bus.

The Start

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The End

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Saejae Bus Terminals

Trains

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A picture of a mugunghwa train arriving at a station in South Korea.
Though limited and require reservations, trains offer an alternative way to get you and your bike to Korea's bike paths.

Train Trials

Want to ride a train with your full-size bike (MTB, road, hybrid)? You’ll need to book a ticket that includes a bike cradle.

How? Download the Korail app or search their website. Find one of the select trains with bicycle seats and purchase it in advance.

Read our guide to the app here and check bike-friendly train timetables here.

  • Booking online or by using the app requires an ARC number or a kind Korean friend.
  • All bicycle tickets come with a seat for the human and a cradle for the bike in an adjoining train car. 
  • All trains accept folding bicycles. No special ticket. Just compact and stuff it in the luggage compartment.

Gyeongbuk Line

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